Archive for the ‘Lightroom’ Category

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New Course on B&W Photography

February 17, 2016

landscape B&W sml

I’m teaching a brand new course on B&W photography at The Chang School of Ryerson University.  You’ll learn about the uniquely photographic world of the B&W image, how to capture, render and print stunning monochrom photographs.

The B&W image forms the very roots of photography, and you’ll be learning how to master the craft and aesthetics of this artform.

The course runs Tuesday evenings, from March 1 to March 22. Here’s the link to the course page on the Ryerson website: DIGITAL B&W PHOTOGRAPHY

Registration is open now for certificate students, general registration opens on Feb 22

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A Lightroom CC Workshop…. keepin’ up with the new stuff!

May 4, 2015

Adobe has just dropped a totally new version of Lightroom… Lightroom CC (aka Lightroom 6).  We get some great new features like HDR and Panoramas built in, new ways to control filters, better Web Galleries, and new ways to share and publish your photos.  Perhaps most significant is the continually evolving integration of Lightroom Mobile (for your phone and tablet) and the impact of Smart Previews on your workflow.

Lightroom can now create Panoramas!

Lightroom can now create Panoramas!

I’ll be digging into all these new features and workflow refinements over the next month, and on June 7, I’ll hold a full day workshop so you can get all the cool new info and see how it will improve your life (at least photographically)!

If you’re feeling the need for a Lightroom update, want to get the most from these new developments, or just want to get more out of Lightroom, this will be a great workshop for you!

Workshop Details:
Sunday, June 7   9:30 – 5:00 (1hr break for lunch)
Location: My Studio in Liberty Village
Cost:  $250 (incl. HST)
Advanced Registration and a $50 deposit are required.

Contact me here if you are interested in this workshop:

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Printer Delight….. A Digital Printing Workshop

February 28, 2012

Is your printer making you crazy, frustrated, disappointed? Colours don’t match your monitor? Never sure what settings to use? Want to make prints that “sing” but you can’t seem to get there? Maybe you’re avoiding printing altogether, or you’re just contemplating purchasing a photo quality printer. Then this is definitely the workshop for you!

You’ll learn the complete printing workflow, from calibrating your monitor to achieving the perfect gallery worthy print.  Here are some of the topics we’ll cover:

  • Monitor Profiling
  • Using a color Managed workflow to save you time. money and frustration
  • Understanding color spaces
  • Using printer profiles
  • Printing from Adobe Lightroom
  • The Photoshop printing workflow
  • Paper choices
  • Optimizing your photos for printing
  • Evaluating and refining your prints

This is a one OR two-day workshop, and you can choose to attend one or both days.

On Saturday we’ll cover the technical aspects of the printing workflow and go through the various steps and choices required to get predictable results that match your monitor.  We’ll also look at preparing photos to be printed at an outside lab.

Sunday’s session will be a hands-on workshop where you’ll be working on your own images, preparing them for printing, making prints, and evaluating the results.  We’ll have a variety of papers for you to experiment with so you can see the effect paper choice makes on the final print.

This workshop will be held at 44 Wide in their state of the art digital classroom, with iMac work stations, using Adobe Lightroom, Epson and Canon printers.

Workshop Details:

Saturday Session:  March 31, 2012     10:00-4:00 (1 hour break for lunch)
Cost:  $200 & HST ($226)

Sunday Session: April 1, 2012    10:00- 4:00  (1 hour break for lunch)
Cost:  $250 & HST ($282.50) including materials

Class size is limited to 16 students.
A $50 deposit is required to hold your spot.

To register contact me here:

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My Hard Drive is Full!…. What Now?

September 2, 2010

I just had an interesting experience dealing with one of the inevitable hassles of digital storage. My external hard drive (750gig) which holds all my photography was filling up! So off I went to a local computer store (Canada Computers on College Street) and bought a big spacious 2 TB drive (For a mere $109). I bought just the bare drive, as I was planning on putting it in the enclosure which houses my current drive.

So now my question was how to get all the photos and some various other stuff I stored on the drive onto my new drive. No big deal, except that I didn’t want to break all my connections in Lightroom and have to go through the process of getting Lightroom to find all my photos again. Since I have a few different catalogs (mostly for teaching purposes) on this one drive it would be a pain to have to reconnect all the Lightroom catalogs.

I thought about migrating all the photographs through the Lightroom interface, but this would involve doing each catalog separately and then copying over the remaining bits and pieces of data that I have on the drive. I didn’t like that idea!

So I decided to try a different approach. I placed the new drive in an enclosure that I happened to have lying around (this is where one of those drive docks would come in handy!). When I mounted and formatted the new drive I was careful to name it exactly the same name as my existing photo drive. To my surprise, both drives showed up on my desktop even though they both have the same name!

I then used a really handy little free program from Lacie (SilverKeeper) to create an exact copy of my very full hard drive on the new drive. The advantage of using a program like SilverKeeper to do this exercise is that it makes an exact copy of your drive, including any invisible files and directory information. The copying process took a while, so I ran it over night while I was sleeping.

In the morning I came down and unplugged both drives. Then I switched the new drive into the old enclosure. (This isn’t really totally necessary step, as I could have left it in the enclosure it was in. However I wanted to use the FireWire 800 enclosure that I had been using, since it provides faster read times than USB) after the switch I plugged in the new drive and launched Lightroom, with my fingers crossed. To my delight, Lightroom found its catalog and all the photos, no problem!

I was very pleased to save myself the hassle of having to relocate all those photos in all my different catalogs. I guess the secret to the trick is to have the new drive named exactly the same name as the old drive so that Lightroom gets tricked into believing that the location hasn’t really changed.

By the way, the ultimate solution to this issue is to purchase a Drobo. These are multi-bay hard drive enclosures that hold four, five, or eight drives. The cool thing about the Drobo is that it combines all the drives into one volume, and it does it in a way that you can actually switch out smaller drives for larger ones without losing any data. It also protects you in case of one drive failing. For those of you who shoot large quantities of photos and or video, the Drobo is a really good idea!

I just thought I’d share this solution with you, since it’s inevitable that one day you’re going to fill up your drive and have to migrate your data, and this method works well with Lightroom.

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Lightroom’s getting more Amazing!

March 27, 2010

Adobe has now released a second Beta version of Lightroom 3, and it has some great new features!  So now is the time to get going with this program, or step your use up to the next level.  So, I’ve scheduled two new Lightroom workshops:

Introduction to Lightroom will cover all the basics of workflow and image development, from importing your shots, organizing and finding the best ones, developing your images and making prints, slideshows and web galleries, all from within Lightroom!

Advanced Lightroom will will explore the power features of this amazing program.  From retouching your photographs, to special effects, working with multiple catalogues, tethered shooting etc.  This is the perfect workshop to step up your game in Lightroom.

In both workshops we’ll be looking at the new features debuting in Lightroom 3.  For complete details on what we’ll cover in both workshops, have a look HERE and HERE.

Workshop Dates:  Intro to Lightroom  Saturday, May 15

Advanced Lightroom   Saturday, June 19

Fee for each workshop:  $210 (incl GST)      $100 deposit to register.

For further information, or to register, contact me here:

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Neat background trick for B&W Portraits

February 10, 2008

This is something I sort of stumbled on recently, but I’m using it more and more.    When I’m shooting a portrait that I intend to use in B&W, I shoot on a mid-blue background (rather than the usual grey, black or white).  Then in Lightroom (or Camera Raw), I convert to Greyscale.  I can now use the blue slider to totally control the tone of the background, adjusting it from blank white to total black, or anywhere in between.  Here’s an example:

  •  Original color shotBlue Slider darkens bkgndBlue Slider lightens bkgndbluebkgnd-5.jpg

One other little trick, or variation:  Rather than hitting the Greyscale mode, leave the shot in color.  Reduce the saturation of all the colors to zero (making the shot B&W).  Then dial up the Blue Saturation slider a bit.  Now play with the Blue Hue slider to shift the color of the background.  Like this:

  •  Alternative

This all works because skin contains no blue tones (at least on most earthlings), so you are able to control the skin tones and the background independently.  HAVE FUN PLAYING!

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